A PhD Program in the Department of Library and Information Science

Dear Colleagues:

The Department of Library and Information Science at Kuwait University is in the process of initiating a Ph D program in the field of information.   In this regard, your input will be helpful in our needs assessment, curriculum design, and other planning activities. We will appreciate it if you kindly provide your input by filling up the questionnaire.

Even if you are not thinking of registering for PhD at this stage, your input will be helpful for us. Please do fill up  questionnaire in the link below. Also, please forward this message (and the questionnaire) to other colleagues and friends who might be interested in enrolling a PhD program in Information  at Kuwait University.

Your assistance in the feasibility study for PhD program will be very much appreciated. If you have any questions with regard to the PhD program, please direct your questions/queries to Professor Sajad ur Rehman, Program Director at rehman05@gmail.com.

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How to be a smarter reader

There’s plenty of advice out there to help you read more – but what about how to get more from what you read? Here’s how

Article by  from The Guardian

How to be a smarter reader

Pursue ‘targeted serendipity’

Pick each new book at random, and you’ll end up with plenty of duds. But if you stick religiously to the same authors or genres, or rely on Amazon’s recommendation engine, which makes suggestions based on past purchases, you’ll never expand your horizons. Choose a middle path: use a recommendation site such as Whichbook, which filters books based on numerous sliding scales – “funny/serious”, “optimistic/bleak”, “no sex/lots of sex” – without knowing which specific titles you’ve previously read.

Stick to print

Quite apart from the romanticism in the smell and feel of “real” books, there’s some persuasive psychological research to suggest that we grasp their content of paper books better and faster than ebooks’. This could be because we subconsciously use physical cues to store information: whether something’s on the left or right page; how many pages are under your right thumb, still to be read, etc.

In one British study, children who read only on screens were three times less likely to say they greatly enjoyed reading. It’s also been argued that the blue light emitted by tablets may seriously interfere with sleep and health.

Read first, talk later

The web offers countless opportunities to join a worldwide, 24-hour book group, such as Readmill, an e-reader platform that lets readers have conversations in the margins. But there’s much to be said for more limited devices – paper books, say, or basic Amazon Kindles – that make it harder for your attention to wander.

As the new media thinker Clay Shirky, no Luddite, puts it: “Tell me later who else liked it. Show them to me, introduce them to me, whatever – not right now. Right now I’m reading.” Make reading and discussing two distinct activities.

Keep it literary

Last year, a controversial but well-designed study at the New School for Social Research in New York, found that reading literary fiction (Don DeLilloAlice Munro) enhanced the capacity for empathy, and that the same didn’t apply to popular fiction or non-fiction. One hunch is that literary fiction leaves more to the reader’s imagination, forcing you to work harder to enter the emotional worlds of others. “What great writers do is to turn you into the writer,” explained one researcher. “In literary fiction, the incompleteness of the characters turns your mind to trying to understand the minds of others.”

Split your time: have a few books on the go

While you’re best advised not to try to read 20 books at once, there are definitely advantages to choosing three or four at once. Have a mix of fiction and non-fiction on the go, each suited to different moods and contexts. Even bad books can help – by sending you back to the good ones. “When you’re not feeling the book in front of you, pick up something else,” writes one blogger, Leigh Kramer, an advocate of the multi-book approach. “This will either make you want to go back to your original choice or press forward with one of your other options.”

Educational Blogging: The Case of Graduate MLIS Students in Kuwait

Libri. International Journal of Libraries and Information Services

Volume 62, Issue 4 (Dec 2012)

Educational Blogging: The Case of Graduate MLIS Students in Kuwait

Dr. Taghreed M. Alqudsi-Ghabra1 / Mohammad Al-Bahrani2

1Founding Chairperson and Former Founding Programme Director, Department of Library and Information Science, College of Social Sciences, Kuwait University, Safat, Kuwait

2Head of Promotion and Advertisement Section, Ministry of Communication, Kuwait

Citation Information: Libri. Volume 62, Issue 4, Pages 389–402, ISSN (Online) 1865-8423, ISSN (Print) 0024-2667,DOI: 10.1515/libri-2012-0030, December 2012

Publication History:

Published Online:
2012-12-11

Abstract

Blogging has been well-established as a communication tool, yet the literature documenting its use in education is still developing and lacks the theoretical underpinning to back it up. Blogging in education and for education has critics as well as promoters. This research is a phenomenological study that aims to create a framework and rationale for the use of blogs in higher education. It is a comparative descriptive analysis of two educational blogging experiences in Kuwait: one is a blog used by a faculty member in the Library and Information Science Department at Kuwait University that is shared with graduate students attending the courses of that faculty. The second is administered by a former graduate student of the MLIS program at Kuwait University and is open to both faculty and students. A comparison of the two experiences is the basis for the analysis and generalizations provided about the use of blogs as an educational tool and for drawing a framework for using blogs in education.

 

Read full article EducationalBlogginglibri-2012-0030

A massive open online course (MOOC) developed by Stanford: Is it the next Higher Education Buzzword Alert!?

 

Check out Coursera website: https://www.coursera.org/

About Coursera

We are a social entrepreneurship company that partners with the top universities in the world to offer courses online for anyone to take, for free. We envision a future where the top universities are educating not only thousands of students, but millions. Our technology enables the best professors to teach tens or hundreds of thousands of students.

Through this, we hope to give everyone access to the world-class education that has so far been available only to a select few. We want to empower people with education that will improve their lives, the lives of their families, and the communities they live in.

Graduation ceremony Class of 2011-2012

Masters in Library and Information Science Graduation ceremony Class of 2011-2012 – Kuwait University – 3/6/2012

حفل تخريج الدفعة الخامسة عشر لقسم علوم المكتبات والمعلومات حملة شهادة
الماجستير – كلية العلوم الاجتماعية – جامعة الكويت
برعاية عميد كلية العلوم الاجتماعية / أ.د. عبدالرضا أسيري

This Video celebrate Sixteen years of achievement by the Department of Library & Information science – college of social science – Kuwait University

The video was created by: Yousef T. Al-Araj

اهدي هذا الفيديو الى قسم علوم المكتبات والمعلومات – كلية العلوم الاجتماعية – جامعة الكويت
وذلك لجميع الانجازات المبهرة الذي قدمها هذا القسم للمجتمع الكويتي والعالمي

اعداد: يوسف توفيق العرج

How do I cite a tweet?

This is from Modern Language Association MLA:  Source

Begin the entry in the works-cited list with the author’s real name and, in parentheses, user name, if both are known and they differ. If only the user name is known, give it alone.

Next provide the entire text of the tweet in quotation marks, without changing the capitalization. Conclude the entry with the date and time of the message and the medium of publication (Tweet). For example:

Athar, Sohaib (ReallyVirtual). “Helicopter hovering above Abbottabad at 1AM (is a rare event).” 1 May 2011, 3:58 p.m. Tweet.

The date and time of a message on Twitter reflect the reader’s time zone. Readers in different time zones see different times and, possibly, dates on the same tweet. The date and time that were in effect for the writer of the tweet when it was transmitted are normally not known. Thus, the date and time displayed on Twitter are only approximate guides to the timing of a tweet. However, they allow a researcher to precisely compare the timing of tweets as long as the tweets are all read in a single time zone.

In the main text of the paper, a tweet is cited in its entirety (6.4.1):

Sohaib Athar noted that the presence of a helicopter at that hour was “a rare event.”

or

The presence of a helicopter at that hour was “a rare event” (Athar).

 

New Arrivals To AUK Library

Dear All

Recently I had a thought, which will be great to our LIS community in Kuwait to announce through our blog the new arrivals of books, journals, audiovisual materials in our field to AUK library. In this way it might be a great opportunity for all of you and a chance to visit us and ask for any of them in anytime.

Cutting-edge social media approaches to business education

Web 2.0 Fundamentals with Ajax, development tools, and mobile platforms

How Green Is My Library?

Web-Based Instruction: A Guide For Libraries

Developing Sustainable Digital Libraries: Socio-Technical perspective

How to Build a Digital Library

Foundations of Library and Information Sciences

Regards

Saleh A. Ebrahim