Educational Blogging: The Case of Graduate MLIS Students in Kuwait

Libri. International Journal of Libraries and Information Services

Volume 62, Issue 4 (Dec 2012)

Educational Blogging: The Case of Graduate MLIS Students in Kuwait

Dr. Taghreed M. Alqudsi-Ghabra1 / Mohammad Al-Bahrani2

1Founding Chairperson and Former Founding Programme Director, Department of Library and Information Science, College of Social Sciences, Kuwait University, Safat, Kuwait

2Head of Promotion and Advertisement Section, Ministry of Communication, Kuwait

Citation Information: Libri. Volume 62, Issue 4, Pages 389–402, ISSN (Online) 1865-8423, ISSN (Print) 0024-2667,DOI: 10.1515/libri-2012-0030, December 2012

Publication History:

Published Online:
2012-12-11

Abstract

Blogging has been well-established as a communication tool, yet the literature documenting its use in education is still developing and lacks the theoretical underpinning to back it up. Blogging in education and for education has critics as well as promoters. This research is a phenomenological study that aims to create a framework and rationale for the use of blogs in higher education. It is a comparative descriptive analysis of two educational blogging experiences in Kuwait: one is a blog used by a faculty member in the Library and Information Science Department at Kuwait University that is shared with graduate students attending the courses of that faculty. The second is administered by a former graduate student of the MLIS program at Kuwait University and is open to both faculty and students. A comparison of the two experiences is the basis for the analysis and generalizations provided about the use of blogs as an educational tool and for drawing a framework for using blogs in education.

 

Read full article EducationalBlogginglibri-2012-0030

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Article: The Internet in the Arab Gulf Cooperation Council (AGCC): Vehicle of Change

International Journal of Internet Science

A peer reviewed open access journal for empirical findings, methodology, and theory of social and behavioral science concerning the Internet and its implications for individuals, social groups, organizations, and society.

The Internet in the Arab Gulf Cooperation Council (AGCC): Vehicle of Change 
Taghreed M. Alqudsi-ghabra1, Talal Al-Bannai2, & Mohammad Al-Bahrani3 
1College of Social Sciences, Kuwait University, the State of Kuwait, 2Kuwait Fund for Economic Development, the State of Kuwait, 3Ministry of Communication, the State of Kuwait

Abstract: The Internet start was somewhat slow in the Middle East, but the twenty-first century witnessed its rapid spread across the Middle East, especially in the Arab countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council, known as the AGCC. Even though these countries share political, geographic and economic commonalities, a level of observed and documented disparity exists among them. This paper is a comparative descriptive profile of the start of the Internet in the six countries of the AGCC, the laws and regulations that govern the flow and control of information, and how the spread of revolts affected the information flow in these countries. As changes in the Middle East are very much enabled by the Internet and its various tools, studies such as this one that attempt to organize scattered information are very important, timely, and needed.

Keywords: Internet, AGCC, Information control in AGCC, ICT infrastructure in AGCC

pdf Download full paper

New Arrivals To AUK Library

Dear All

Recently I had a thought, which will be great to our LIS community in Kuwait to announce through our blog the new arrivals of books, journals, audiovisual materials in our field to AUK library. In this way it might be a great opportunity for all of you and a chance to visit us and ask for any of them in anytime.

Cutting-edge social media approaches to business education

Web 2.0 Fundamentals with Ajax, development tools, and mobile platforms

How Green Is My Library?

Web-Based Instruction: A Guide For Libraries

Developing Sustainable Digital Libraries: Socio-Technical perspective

How to Build a Digital Library

Foundations of Library and Information Sciences

Regards

Saleh A. Ebrahim

2011 Science-Technology Division & Arabian Gulf Chapter Student Award

2011 Science-Technology Division & Arabian Gulf Chapter Student Award
to attend Special Libraries Association (SLA) Conference in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 12 – 15 June 2011

In 2011 SLA Arabian Gulf Chapter will be offering an Award jointly with Science-Technology Division (DST) of SLA.

The successful applicant will receive an award of US$2,000, towards the cost of attending the 2011 SLA Annual Conference (which includes conference registration, accommodation, and economy return airfare to Philadelphia, PA).

The award will be formally acknowledged at the SLA Conference in Philadelphia at the Science-Technology Division’s Awards Ceremony.

Eligibility:

Applicants must:

  • Have an excellent command of written and spoken English,
  • Be enrolled in a Master level LIS programme in Arabian Gulf countries during the current academic year
  • Be eligible to travel to the USA
  • Be interested in a career in special librarianship, preferably with a focus on working in a science and technology environment.
  • Be a first-time attendee at an SLA conference

Application Procedure

1. Please write a two-part essay, in English, of a total of approximately 500 words, which:

  1. Tells us why you chose to enrol in a graduate/master LIS programme and what you hope to do with your degree and especially why you might wish to work in the science and technology area, and
  2. Addresses one of the following three topics:
  • What skills must the new information professional possess and why?
  • What is the biggest challenge facing the profession, in general, and information professionals in your country, in particular?
    • What benefits/knowledge do you hope to gain from attending the 2011 SLA conference? (Do not describe what you will do during the conference).
  1. Include a letter of recommendation, from your programme advisor or an SLA member who knows you well, which explains why you would be a good candidate for this award.
  1. Include a copy of your current CV including your postal, and email addresses and telephone number.
  1. Please prepare all documents in Microsoft Word and send by e-mail no later than                         15 February 2011 to the following two people:
  2. i.    Sultan Al-Daihani, SLA Arabian Gulf Chapter at s.aldaihani@ku.edu.kw and to
  1. ii.    Sheila Rosenthal, Chair of the DST Awards Committee at  slr@sei.cmu.edu

The Award winner will be notified by 20 February 2011.

Post Award Requirements

The recipient of the 2011 Science-Technology Division / Arabian Gulf Chapter Student Award will be:

  1. Required to write a brief article on their conference experience for publication in the September / October 2011 issue of the Science-Technology Division’s newsletter,             Sci-Tech News, and for the SLA Arabian Gulf Chapter’s website
  1. Asked to maintain contact with the SLA Arabian Gulf Chapter Board during the year of their Award.
  1. Asked to serve on a Science-Technology Division Committee of their choice.

Contacts will be appointed from SLA Arabian Gulf Chapter Board and the Science-Technology Division for the duration of the award.

For further information about the Award’s co-sponsors, please consult their websites:

For further information about the Award, please contact Sultan Al-Daihani s.aldaihani@ku.edu.kw

Lessons from Less

I really, really, really like this article. I wish i could do the same one day. Enjoy reading.

From: Courtney at her blog, Be More with Less


When I was 16, I wanted more. When I was 24, I wanted even more than that. So, I worked harder, earned more, spent more, to have more, only to owe more. I was exhausted at the end of the day and tired when I woke up most mornings. I ate on the fly, fell behind, ran late and could never catch up. Sound familiar?

I thought everything I was doing was for a better life. I thought what I was doing was normal and right. I had become so used to bills in the mailbox, and feeling rundown, that I didn’t know anything was wrong. So, how did I go from wanting more, more, more to craving less? I would love to tell you that I woke up one morning a changed person, but that’s not the way it went down. Even though I had begun to make small changes, I needed a wake up call … and it had to be really loud.

On July, 7th 2006 I was diagnosed with relapsing remitting Multiple Sclerosis. That was my wake up call, and to say it was loud is an understatement. The diagnosis was nothing short of traumatic. I didn’t have enough information to take action. I only knew enough to be really scared. I had so many questions. Could I still ski with my family? Would I be able to help my daughter with homework? Would I even be walking in a year?

No one had the answers to those overwhelming questions, so I had to focus on what was most important: my health and my family. Nothing else mattered. If I had moved forward with these big questions and fearful thinking, my daughter and husband would have been so worried. I realized that if I started thinking differently, so would they. My questions went from, “What is this disease going to do to my body and mind?” to “How am I going to reverse MS?”

The answer to my question was change. Small shifts and big change were necessary to become the best possible version of myself. When I started making changes in my life, I didn’t know that they would lead to minimalism, but they did. In fact, while the changes I made were fighting MS, they were also redefining my whole life. The changes I made are not all essential in the life of a minimalist, but they are all essential to my minimalist lifestyle.

What I did to change my life:

I became a vegetarian. Research shows that MS patients, and people dealing with other autoimmune conditions that eat fewer saturated fats and “inflammatory foods” maintain better health. (I would challenge that this goes for most everyone.) Giving up meat was one of the best ways I could really “do something” about my new diagnosis. I stopped eating meat to achieve better health.

When I started my vegetarian journey, I started reading. I read about raising animals for meat. I read about factory farming. I learned about the impact of our actions on our bodies, animals and the earth. By really opening my eyes and heart to how meat was put on my plate, I lost my appetite for it. I was motivated by health and changed with compassion.

I fell in love with yoga. Practicing Yoga gives me strength, flexibility, focus, peace of mind and freedom from fear. I want to keep my body strong, and my mind calm and focused so I can effectively fight this disease and take care of my family. While I am in search of less, I want to be more sensitive and loving, more adaptive and more resilient. Yoga gives me that, too.

I got rid of my stuff. While I always felt compelled to put something on an empty surface, I have come to love an empty space. It takes living without it to realize how clutter affects your life and takes away from your freedom and creativity. I am reminded of that every time I walk into my kitchen and instead of seeing a cluttered counter, I see sunlight streaming in from the kitchen window. I am still letting go of my stuff and feel lighter everyday.

I decided to live without debt. You may not think that your bank account can affect your health, but considering money can cause great stress, and stress can make you sick, it only makes sense that poor money management equals poor health. My husband and I made the decision to be debt free, and paid off our last debt this summer except for our house. What will we do with our money now that we don’t have any monthly payments? Whatever we want.

I hung up the phone. I do not use my phone when I’m driving anymore. I don’t text at red lights or make calls on the back roads. I can remember too many times where I would arrive at a destination and not remember how I got there because I was so involved in a phone call. Admitting that I had essentially been risking my life and the lives of other drivers wasn’t easy, but it was necessary to make the change and the commitment to be phone free in the car.

Another benefit is that now, when I pick my daughter up from school, she has my full attention. She doesn’t have to compete with business or other phone fueled distractions. I am there for her.

I redefined better. As I mentioned before, all of my bad habits came from wanting something better, something more. In the changes I’ve made, I have redefined what better means to me and my family. The health and happiness of my marriage and family comes before everything else. My husband and I have decided that “more” isn’t the answer for us.

Now at 41, forever changed, and virtually symptom free, I am becoming me. I know I haven’t figured it all out but am content. I don’t make as much as I used to. I didn’t take a big vacation this year or make any big purchases, but there is no doubt that I am happier. Less speaks to me. Less lets me love more deeply and less lets me really be me.

My wake up calls have become more subtle, but because I have the time and space to pay attention, I hear them loud and clear. When I first started to practice doing less and being more, I discovered Zen Habits. It was another wake up call, but it sounded like a whisper, “You can do this. You can change.” It is not a coincidence that Leo Babauta’s story of change changed me. I was ready to listen, ready to change.

The biggest lesson I’ve learned is that less is enough. Of course, I am still learning, still changing and still a work in progress, but now it is my turn to inspire change with my story.

 

Online Information, London 2010

In a previous post, our brother Mohammad has posted something about the trip that we were together attending the 2010 online information conference in UK. The conference was more than great in terms of tracks and sessions, seminars and workshops, and finally the exhibitions and the cafeteria that we didn’t have anything from it 🙂 . I was fully sponsored by the SAGE publisher the 4th biggest vendor in the information industry world to attend the conference. so thank you SAGE for your hospitality.

Yesterday I was again with two lovely teachers Dr. Samir and Dr. Taghreed. we had a great time talking about many things, one of them was the conference. so that Dr. Taghreed asked me to post something in the blog and if anyone interested in any information regarding the sessions I will be a big help. And Dr. Samir also was advising me what to write, so that I have legal content that no one would accuse Mohammed and shutdown his blog hehehe…

Anyway, the conference is the largest UK event dedicated to the information industry, providing an annual meeting place for more than 9,000 attendees from over 40 countries across the globe.  This unique free-to-attend event consists of an exhibition with more than 200 international exhibitors, an extensive educational show floor seminar programme, plus a range of exciting and stimulating show features.  Focusing on new technologies and key sectors,  the show covers 6 different subject areas: Content Resources, ePublishing Solutions, Library Management, Content Management, Search Solutions and Social Media.

Attending around 6 sessions from different tracks, was something great that added to my humble knowledge so many. accordingly, I wish to share with you any of the information that it would be beneficial to your area of interest. you may find all tracks and sessions in here or in PDF and you may email me for any inquiries in regard to those sessions and their papers.

Note: my email is sebrahim@auk.edu.kw and your comments are highly appreciated

Here are some pictures from the exhibition:

Truly

Saleh A. Ebrahim

Naif Al-Mutawa At TED: Superheroes inspired by Islam

What connects Librarians, Superman, Prophet Moses, Spiders, Kuwait, Dar Alhikma, and much more information packed in this 21 minutes video for Naif Al-Mutawa speaking at TED. And if you don’t know what is TED then you are missing allot.

TED (Technology Entertainment and Design) is a global set of conferences curated by the American private non-profit Sapling Foundation, formed to disseminate “ideas worth spreading”. Since June 2006,[1] the talks have been offered for free viewing online, under a Creative Commons license, through TED.com. As of July 2010, over 700 talks are available free online. By January 2009 they had been viewed 50 million times; In July 2010, the viewing figure stands at more than 290 million, attracted a still growing global audience

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Naif Al-Mutawa